August 29, 2006

My wakeup HR dropped a bit

My wakeup HR this morning was 51. That decrease, from 53 yesterday, shows my body is recovering from my cold. My nose has mostly dried up and I feel pretty good. I'm taking another rest day today. Younger runners could run through this cold, but at my age I need more rest. Hopefully I'll be able to run tomorrow.

Training Graphs

3 comments:

robison52 said...

Howdy! I don't have a cold, but I am getting symptoms of an allergy, itchy eyes and running nose. Happens everytime this year when Fall starts approaching. One nice thing about the upcoming weather change, the forcast for the end of the week will finally have a high of LESS than 100 degrees!! I'll be off the treadmill soon. Hope you get better soon. Happy trails, Bruce

Phil said...

I also have a cold and i am trying to train to run a Marathon. Is it best just to rest because i feel like i am getting behind on routine?

Great blog btw :)

Allen said...

Hi Bruce,

I've had an alergy all summer, but this was a real cold. However, my body came back fast. In one day I went from thin mucus to the beginnings of thick mucus, and in three days my nose was almost dried up. Usually, it would take me 3-4 days to go from thin to thick mucus. I guess the 14 hours sleep I got on Sunday helped.

Max below 100 (F), wow! You better start wearing layers when you leave your mill so you don't get cold while you run. :)

Hi Phil, I'm glad you're enjoying the blog. Some runners run through colds with no problems. I think it all depends on ones energy level. In my case this week I had no energy on Sunday and slept for a total of 14 hours. On Monday I could tell my energy level was higher, so I gave myself two days to rest and then ran an hour this morning. We're all different and react to colds differently.

24 years ago when I ran marathons I always ran through colds because my energy level wasn't affected much. Now that I'm older, I get tired more often and give myself more rest. If I feel tired before a run, that is a sign I need rest. Some world-class runners suggest a rest-week of reduced running once a month.